Health

Mental Health Tips for the Workplace: How to Spot the Signs

Mental health can often become an afterthought in workplaces, but mental illness affects an estimated 15% of Americans, and that number is likely to increase as companies become increasingly competitive and time-starved. According to the World Health Organization, workplace factors that increase the probability of mental health problems and mental illness include lack of appropriate mental health policies, lack of flexibility, lack of time off, and high workloads. In addition, employees who are exposed to a variety of stressful workplace situations, such as bullying, harassment, and high levels of stress, may also exhibit signs of mental illnesses.

Workplace stress, anxiety, and depression are major health concerns. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 60 million adults in the U.S. are living with depression, while 40 million adults in the U.S. are living with anxiety. Of those, 30 million adults in the U.S. are living with depression, and 19 million adults are living with anxiety—and those numbers are on the rise.

Symptoms

The symptoms in mental health are neck pain, back pain, joint pain, knee pain, and muscle pain. Symptoms in mental health are more common in women than in men. These symptoms may be mild or severe. However, these symptoms are temporary and can go away only after proper treatment. Additionally, symptoms in mental health can be caused by certain diseases.

There are a lot of signs that can point to a serious health problem. But how do you know which ones matter and which ones don’t? The guidelines for diagnosing symptoms and suggesting treatment are published in a handbook called the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The DSM-5, as it is commonly called, was created by a committee of psychiatrists from all over the nation, and it includes detailed descriptions of all the diseases and disorders that psychiatrists can diagnose. The DSM-5, published in 2013, replaced the DSM-IV, which was published in 1994, and put in place a classification system for mental disorders.

Mental health conditions

Mental health conditions are common but frequently misunderstood. Millions of Americans are dealing with mental health issues. They may be common, but that doesn’t mean they’re easy to manage. In fact, a diagnosis of a mental health condition means a person has to cope with the stigma of mental illness along with the physical discomfort of symptoms. There is no “one-size-fits-all” treatment. Treatment focuses on helping people manage their symptoms, improve their quality of life and cope with daily challenges.

Common problems

Mental health plays an important role in healthcare and its quality. The importance of health is seen when a hospital employs hospital health standards in its daily operations and procedures. Hospital health standards help in maintaining the quality of healthcare services delivered. It also helps in encouraging more hospitals to adhere to these standards.

Many health problems can be prevented with lifestyle changes. However, sometimes it’s difficult to make those lifestyle changes. To make your health a priority, it’s important to address common health problems like stress, blood sugar issues, and muscle soreness, which all contribute to poor health.

Less common severe mental health conditions

Getting help for mental health conditions like OCD, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia can be difficult. These conditions are less common than common mental health ones like depression and anxiety. However, they do affect about 1% of the overall population, and many of them can be debilitating. These conditions should be taken seriously and treated appropriately.

Atypical personalities

Atypical personality is a term that describes a person who is gifted but somewhat anxious or shy. In fact, the term atypical personality was originally applied in the psychiatric world to describe people with a specific type of disorder. Atypical personality is not one specific disorder but an umbrella term that refers to a group of disorders that involve a marked impairment in communication, learning, and functioning. 

There are three types of atypical personalities: Asperger’s syndrome, nonverbal learning disorder, and PDD-NOS, which stands for a pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. The terms Asperger’s syndrome and PDD-NOS are often used interchangeably but differ in how severely a person experiences symptoms. People with Asperger’s syndrome experience mild to severe impairments in communication, social skills, and relating to others. People with PDD-NOS only experience mild impairments in communication. 

The workplace can be a stressful and fast-paced environment. With so many things going on at once, it’s important to take note of the changes in your colleagues’ behavior. If you notice an increase in stress, anxiety, anger, or depression, then this may be a sign that a colleague may be struggling.