Health

Cancer Screenings All Men Need

Got a new testicular cancer screening? Are you scared it will be the one and only time? The American Cancer Society says men start at age 21 and should start their testicular cancer screening by age 25. But some people don’t feel like waiting that long, so they go for a testicular cancer screening at an earlier age. It’s common knowledge that you’re more likely to get cancer than you are to die from it. It’s also common knowledge that the earlier you catch it, the better your chances of beating it. It’s, therefore, no surprise that cancer screenings are offered more freely to men of age 45 and older and are recommended for men aged 40-49 in order to catch early pre-cancerous conditions. Unfortunately, with such a wide age range, the medical community often assumes that everyone falls within that age range. Unfortunately, that’s not the case.

We are all familiar with the yearly mammogram, which some doctors consider a more effective way to screen for breast cancer than regular annual blood tests. The regular mammogram is done by putting a full-body picture of the patient on an X-ray machine that rotates back and forth. Then, an ultrasound machine can be used to produce a more detailed image of the breast, using waves that are bounced off the breast. This is something that can also be done with men. But when it comes to the key ones men should undergo, these below are the big ones.

Colon and Rectal Cancer Screening

It’s never too early to start screening for colon and rectal cancer. That’s the message from doctors who think that regular colonoscopies and endoscopies are two of the best ways to make sure you have a cancer-free colon.

Many people don’t know that Colon and Rectal cancer can be found early through routine testing. A person can have a yearly colonoscopy that can find anything from pre-cancerous growths to solid tumors that are still curable. In addition, some low-risk cancers can be found by the use of a simple test, called a fecal occult blood test (FOBT).

Lung Cancer Screening

The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLCT) was a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that examined the benefits of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in asymptomatic men 40 years or older. Screening for cancer in men over 40 years of age is controversial since it may lead to false-positive results, lead to unnecessary radiation and create psychological distress. As many of you know, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The good news is that lung cancer is very treatable, with the most effective treatment being surgery. However, there are approximately 300,000 new cases of lung cancer diagnosed each year in the United States, which is a staggering statistic.

Skin Cancer Risk

Sunscreen has become a controversial topic. There are some people who claim it is the only way to protect yourself from sunburn, while others claim there is no scientific proof that regular use of sunscreen can prevent skin cancer. The sun is your ally. The sun gives you life and helps you grow. But, it can also be your enemy. The sun is a source of not only vitamin D, which helps your body get a healthy dose of calcium and phosphorus. The sun has also been implicated in causing skin cancer. So, how do you know when to avoid the sun and how much? The best advice is to ask yourself if you have any skin cancer history or if your parents, siblings, grandparents, or children have had skin cancer.

As we all know, skin cancer is the most common form of malignancy in the United States, resulting in over one million deaths every year. The problem is that even though we know that sun exposure is a risk factor for skin cancer, few people actually have sun protection on whenever they venture outside.

Most people think that cancer is a disease that only affects older adults. But cancer can strike at any age. Cancer is not a one-size-fits-all problem, and there is nothing you can do to prevent it. The best thing you can do when you find out you have cancer is to go to your doctor and talk to them about what is happening in your body. Men, just what does checking your PSA levels or the status of your prostate gland mean for you? In fact, some researchers now believe that men should be screened at age 45 for prostate cancer and that they should be tested more frequently.